Madagascar National Parks

Madagascar national park systems pair with almost three dozen special reserves—and a handful of private and integral reserves—to protect an astonishing array of wildlife species across the island. The country’s biodiversity level is nothing short of jaw-dropping. A massive 97% of them are endemic to Madagascar the country, meaning they are only found there and no where else in the world. The declining forests are home to hundreds of butterfly varieties, 28 bat types, almost half the chameleon varieties in the world, and upwards of 60 different kinds of lemurs. The landscapes are incredibly unique; scenic, mile-long coasts, dry woods filled with beautiful baobab trees, plunging gorges peppered with vermillion soil, creature-filled marine parks, and pervading wildlife set the stage for extraordinary adventures. There are a number of excellent Madagascar hotels, wildlife lodges, and beach resorts that are located near the national parks. 

Ranomafana National Park

Ranomafana National Park

Ranomafana National Park

On the southeast coast among humid, evergreen forests is Ranomafana National Park, where five hiking circuits offer a comprehensive look around the park and a solid introduction to the particular species found there. The park is easily accessible, features incredible biodiversity, and also has developed infrastructure, thus it has drawn large crowds since 1991 when it was first established. The park’s mountainous terrain is home to the extremely endangered golden bamboo lemur. Visitors can also discover more than 100 bird species, plummeting streams, orchids, palms, and carnivorous plants.

Zahamena National Park

Zahamena National Park

Zahamena National Park

Zahamena National Park is on the east side of the island and divided into two distinct area—west and east--which are divided by a natural corridor where several small villages are located. So far, the hilly terrain, home to abrupt valleys, is not well known to scientists. High canopies top steamy evergreen forests sheltering a large number of the seemingly endless species living within. Intense biodiversity is what makes this one of the most interesting of all Madagascar national parks with almost 50 mammals including more than a dozen lemur varieties.

Andohahela National Park

Andohahela National Park

Andohahela National Park

Transition zone, dry, and rainforest comprise this three-part park and create a bevy of habitats for a huge array of wildlife. Andohahela National Park has been protected by its people since 1939 but wasn’t inaugurated as a national park until more recently in 1998. Just 20 miles northwest of Fort Dauphin, Andohahela provides a great sketch of both eastern and southern Madagascar’s flora, fauna, and brilliant landscapes.

Marojejy National Park

Marojejy National Park

Marojejy National Park

Primitive primary forests, tree-laden lichens, mountainous landscapes, lush rainforests, spongy mosses, and ferns galore admit a pleasant Jurassic feel. The scenes here are striking, and the backdrop rather quiet compared to many of the more popular Madagascar national parks, making it a peaceful haven beckoning further exploration. Marojejy became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2007, recognized for its unparalleled beauty and impressive biodiversity. More than 150 amphibian species, 45 mammal varieties, 50 palm species, and 274 species of fern are part of the natural bounty.

Amber Mountain National Park

Almost at the northern tip of Madagascar, Amber Mountain National Park was first established in 1958, one of the oldest protected Madagascar national parks. The massive tropical forest within the park is its biggest and best feature. It’s laden with endemic flora and fauna, several volcanic lakes, myriad waterfalls, and lush vegetation. The climate is ideal; the lowland heat is continuously pushed up and away by the cool, refreshing air. If visiting, try an arrival between September and November when the warm temperatures offer perfect conditions for wildlife to be at their most active. Though it does rain, it’s only from time to time.

Isalo National Park

Isalo National Park

Isalo National Park

In the southeast is Isalo National Park, first established as one of the Madagascar national parks in 1962. The park’s most interesting feature is the massive sandstone mountain range that has been wildly carved by rain and wind into strange ridges that present some very bizarre forms, amazing canyons, deep gorges and minute stalagmite peaks. The landscape represents a vision reminiscent of the wild west, with grassy plains giving way to a surrounding massif, where the weather is tropical and dry with warm temperatures throughout the year.

Tsingy de Namoroka National Park

Tsingy de Namoroka National Park

Tsingy de Namoroka National Park

This long-time protected park has been so since 1966 but has only just achieved national park status in 2007. Found in the northwest, Tsingy presents an array of ecosystems and landscapes, formed in majority by shrubby, grassy savannahs with stunning baobabs and deciduous woodlands. Subtropical forests within the marshes, canyons, cave systems, rice paddies, and naturally occurring pools are main attractions along with the diverse wildlife and tsingy formations, also called the stone forest. The hot and rainy months from November through March create inaccessible conditions. Though known for high temperatures, the dry season between April through October is the ideal time for vacations.

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Antananarivo Madagascar

Antananarivo

Antananarivo Madagascar is a unique city unlike any in Africa. Founded during...

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