Tokyo Disneyland

The first ever Disney theme park to be constructed on foreign soil, Tokyo Disneyland has become the most visited theme park in the whole world. The most popular rides are here, along with everything you've come to expect from a Disneyland venture: magic, fun, and days of entertainment for both child and adult.

Tokyo Disneyland opened in 1983, lovingly based upon both the American theme parks - Disneyland and Disneyworld. Taking the most popular parts of both of these parks is just one of the reason that no one does Disney better than Japan. There is even a Tokyo Disneyland hotel called the Disney Ambassador that is modeled just like the original in Anaheim. Strangely enough, it's the only of the Disney parks that is not, technically, owned by the Disney Company – rather the characters are just licensed out to a Japanese corporation that runs the park. Even so, everything you'd expect from a Disney vacation are on display at the Tokyo Disneyland.

When it came time to expand overseas, to make another Disneyland, Japan was a great fit. Tokyo contains the world's biggest population, mixed with millions of tourists per year, so the match between Disney and Japan's largest city was destined for greatness. Now the park owns a sister property, Tokyo DisneySea, and continues to be one of the city's major tourist attractions.

Like any Disneyland, Japan's version is split four ways. Adventureland, Fantasyland, Tomorrowland and Westernland (this park's version of Frontierland) are all on hand here, as well as Mickey's Toontown and Critter Country. These layouts don't differ much from the American institution—right down to Cinderella's Castle, most of Tokyo Disneyland is a direct replica. Which is certainly not a bad thing, but there are a few differences. For instance, Main Street U.S.A. has been given the more cosmopolitan name of World's Bazaar. The railroad that normally circles Adventureland is absent, and the Haunted House is moved to Fantasyland—the Japanese belief that ghosts can only exist in fairy tales still holds true, even in Disneyland. Japan's version diverges little outside of these cosmetic changes. You'll still find signature Disney rides like: Space Mountain, Star Tours and Splash Mountain.

For Disney magic that never stops, even after you've left the park, you can stay at the famed Tokyo Disneyland hotel, the Disney Ambassador. Every bit the same as the other Disney hotels, with all the same perks and amenities. If you are also heading over to Tokyo DisneySea, there is another Tokyo Disneyland hotel located adjacent to that park, called the Tokyo DisneySea Hotel MiraCosta.

You're never too old or too young for a Disneyland adventure—so grab the kids and head to Tokyo Disneyland because, really, it's a guaranteed hit. Guaranteed.

Compare Travel Sites and Save!

Akihabara Icon-360-sm

Akihabara

Akihabara —also known as Akihabara Electric Town or simply Akiba, for short—i...

Sony Building Tokyo

Sony Building

Sony Building Tokyo, was completed and opened in 1966, and serves as the corp...

Latest Topics

Sapporo Snow Festival

There are several ice sculpture festivals upcoming in January and February and one of the biggest...

Takayama Autumn Festival

One of Japan's top festivals takes place October 9 and 10. The Takayama Autumn Festival is a...

More Forum Posts »