Volgograd Russia

Volgograd Russia, once known as Stalingrad, sits on the west bank of the Volga River in the southern part of the country. The Volgograd International Airport, the railroad station, and route E40 handle the brunt of traffic going in and out of this junction, making it an easy place to reach for those traveling around Russia and looking to see some of its major cities and historic sights. Among the many attractions to see during Volgograd tours, Mother Russia literally stands above the rest—the statue at Mamayev Kurgan overlooks the city and commemorates a bloody period in local history.

During World War II, Stalingrad Russia staged a heroic resistance against the Nazi invaders, and though it was almost completely leveled, it stands today with great pride as a new city; the ruins have disappeared, replaced by a reconstructed city filled with museums and monuments commemorating those who lost their lives in one of the most devastating battles in human history, with an estimated 2 million people killed between July 1942 and February 1943, twice what the population of the city is today. Before it was Stalingrad, Volgograd Russia was known as Tsaritsyn, a key river port and commercial hub. The city took its current name in 1961 as part of the de-Stalinization program, and though there have been several proposals to revert back to Stalingrad due to its historical value, it has not been accepted by the government.

Visitors will find a host of interesting sites to visit during their Volgograd travel, including architectural beauties, the natural splendor of the surroundings, and commemorative museums and sculptures. Pavlov’s house was a fortified apartment building during World War II, becoming a symbol of the resistance, and though it was reconstructed after the war, bricks from the rubble were pieced back together on the eastern side of the building as a memorial. The Volga River and other parks offer beautiful places for sightseeing, relaxation, picnicking, and contemplation.

Visitors can also go on Volgograd tours along the river; one important tour in the city is the Russian Battlefield Tour, which runs at a fairly costly price, but spans the course of twelve days with accommodations, meals, fares, services and entrance fees all included. Among the most important attractions in Volgograd is the Motherland Calls statue, standing in memory of that devastating battle; other statues can be found in the vicinity, and many visitors can relax on the green during the warmer seasons. Near the Motherland statue is the Panorama Museum, which is home to numerous artifacts from World War II, including a rifle that belonged to the famous Russian sniper Vasily Zaitsev.

Volgograd travel is served by rail, car, and air; depending on your preferences and origination, any one of these choices will be a great option for reaching the city. The railway is connected to various regions in Russia, including Moscow, the Caucasus, and Siberia. E40 is a European route passing through France, Kazakhstan, and Volgograd Russia, but arriving by air is probably the most convenient for visitors coming over a long distance.

Volgograd travel is filled with a variety of interesting attractions commemorating the glory of its heroic resistance, and while it is a peaceful city off the well-beaten tourist path, it is certainly worth the detour for a host of lasting memories and wonderful historical experiences. Volgograd tours offer a chance to learn about twentieth-century Russian history in a unique and affecting way and are well worth the experience.

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