Turkey Hostels

Turkey hostels and a scattering of basic two- and three-star hotels provided some of the only accommodation in the country's interior from the 1960s through most of the 1980s. The people who visited the more remote regions such as Cappadocia and Mount Nemrut were primarily intrepid young backpackers and trekkers looking for the cheapest place to unroll their sleeping bags or the few travelers willing to sacrifice luxury and comfort in order to see these remarkable sights. Today five-star luxury hotels and resorts have sprung up just about everywhere where there are attractions to see. While most of the former Turkish hostels have been converted into little bed and breakfast pensions in Turkey or charming boutique hotels, there still are some remaining in the country.

There is plenty of cheap lodging in Turkey available for those a budget, but there are still people looking for the experience of traditional Turkish hostels and the camaraderie they offer. While deluxe beach resorts are the norm in Antalya, the little St. Nicholas Pension allows you to enjoy the beauties of Patara Beach for only a few dollars a night, including a traditional Turkish breakfast. It is in the center of the village and offers shuttle service to and from the beach. Also in Antalya are rustic cabins and even camping platforms at the unusual Kabay Tree Houses. While there are no Turkey hostels in Antalya any longer, these two properties provide the kind of bohemian style many hostel enthusiasts enjoy.

Likewise, there are no more hostels in Turkey around the Cappadocia cave churches and monasteries. However, there are some very inexpensive pensions, including modest cave hotels that offer basic accommodations, some even in dormitory style. The Nomad Cave Hotel is one of the most charming of these, and can even assist you in booking Cappadocia balloon tours. It is only a five-minute walk from the bus station, meaning you can save money both on transportation and lodging costs so that you can splurge on exciting experiences like soaring over the beautiful valley in a hot air balloon.

Kusadasi is a coastal city with many upscale beach resorts along popular Ladies Beach, and is a port call harbor for cruise ships stopping for Ephesus shore excursions. One of the remaining traditional hostels in Turkey is located here—the Stella Hostel and Travelers Inn. It promotes itself as the "backpackers paradise," and has dormitory rooms with shared shower and toilet facilities that are very inexpensive as well as slightly more expensive private sea view rooms. It has a wonderful swimming pool and sundeck area, and provides a safe place to store your gear while exploring in the region. This is one of the best Turkish hostels along the beautiful Turquoise Coast, allowing you to experience a beautiful resort area on a budget. The Bodrum Backpackers is the only one of the true Turkey hostels in that city. It is located right in the city, and is a clean, safe, family run hostel offering both dorms and private rooms. Unlike many hostels, there is no curfew, so guests can enjoy the city's nightlife to the fullest.

You will also find true hostels in Turkey in the great city of Istanbul. One of the best is the Old City Hostel, with a rooftop terrace that has superb close-up views of the marvelous Blue Mosque. It is within walking distance of Sultanahmet Square where many of the city's best attractions are located, including the beautiful Hagia Sophia and Basilica Cistern. It has dormitory rooms as well as some private rooms, several comfortable common rooms, and a lively bar with convivial nightlife.

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