Haunted Castles in England

Haunted Castles in England are surrounded by legends created by centuries of richly detailed stories detailing some of the most frightful and fascinating castles in the world. The intangible but realer-than-real feel inside these castles signifies years of punishment, torture, and plain tragedy. Though many claim to be haunted by ghosts, this list surely details some of the most popular and genuine haunted castles in England.

Hever Castle

Hever Castle
Hever Castle

Located in Kent, parts of Hever Castle were first built in 1270 AD. Made famous by daughter Anne Boleyn, 2nd wife of King Henry VIII, the Boleyn family bought the castle in the 16th century. It is famously known to be haunted by Lady Anne Bolyen, who was brutally executed upon orders by King Henry VIII. Though her ghost is spotted throughout the castle, it is most often spotted walking on the castle’s wooden bridge and within the gardens.

Corfe Castle

Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle

Dorset’s Corfe Castle high up on cliffs is only a shadow of its original grandeur. Historical facts deem multiple hauntings. Before construction, the site was the place of King Edward the Martyr’s murder by his very own stepmother. It was built by William the Conqueror and then owned by King John who added the prisons, said to be the site of hundreds of deaths. Lord Chief Justice Sir John Bankes owned the castle from 1635 onward. During the English Civil War, his wife Lady Bankes defended it until cruelly betrayed by one of her own. Several years later, her headless ghost, also called the “White Lady” began appearing around the grounds.

Arundel Castle

Arundel Castle
Arundel Castle

Arundel Castle is haunted by several ghosts, making it one of the most foreboding in the country. The ghost of a young female wanders Hiornes Tower, forever mourning her lost love, and a permanent fixture since her suicide. A young kitchen hand beaten cruelly by his master appears cleaning dishes in a kitchen he frequented 200 hundred years ago. The Blue Man, is a fixture in the greatest gothic room, the library. His living presence dates back to the reign of King Charles II. The sighting of a tiny white bird signifies a connection with a resident’s sudden death and is an emblem of tragedy to come.

Bamburgh Castle

Bamburgh Castle
Bamburgh Castle

In early 1000AD, Bamburgh Castle was owned the Monarchy who allotted it to the Northumbrian Forster’s for a 400 year governorship. Afterwards, it fell into centuries of disrepair until restored by a rich industrialist. Many have felt mysterious shoulder taps near the library stairs. Legend of the “Pink Lady” ghost also perseveres; another devastating tale of true love lost and mourned for eternity.

Berkeley Castle

Berkeley Castle
Berkeley Castle

In 1153 AD, a shell keep was built, which eventually became Berkeley Castle. It was made famous as the prison housing Edward II in 1327 AD, put there by his wife and her lover in hopes he would perish. He survived and this created upset, and rage. His wife planned an unthinkable torture performed on him in a room inside the castle. So brutal was the torture it’s said visitors can still hear his screams once a year.

Chillingham Castle

Chillingham Castle
Chillingham Castle

Chillingham Castle originated in the 13th century, famous for its torture chambers and original torture devices. Radiant Boy in the castle’s Pink Room is the best known ghost, know for his terrifying cries of suffering coinciding with an eerie blue light. During upgrades in the 1920s a blue dress along with the bones of a young boy were located inside the walls in the room where he appears. Whispering voices in the library, the ghost of Lord Grey of Warks’ wife, Lady Mary Berkeley, and a thirsty lady in white appearing to the guards near the pantry are just a few more of the instances of eerie happenings with Chill ingham Castle.

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