Nova Scotia Provincial Parks

Nova Scotia provincial parks preserve a wide array of landscapes. This diverse collection of parks, spread throughout the province, include beaches, meadows, forests, and other outdoor landscapes. No matter where your vacations take you, it will be easy to include one of parks in your plans. You won't have to spend very long traveling from the major destinations because so many parks are available. For a small entry fee, you'll have access to some amazing outdoor scenery where you can commune with nature and have some fun along the way.

As oasis of calm settled into an urban landscape, Long Lake Provincial Park is located just behind Exhibition Park, the events center in Halifax. Here you'll find acres and acres of outdoor space, perfect for spending some time away from the hustle and bustle of the every day. Designated an urban wilderness, Long Lake Provincial Park is managed as a conservation area. You won't find asphalt trails and snack shops, but you will find nature trails and quiet lakeside vistas. If want to get in a nice stroll, try some geocaching, or embarking on an extensive nature hike, you will have the chance to do so in this natural oasis.

Long Lake Provincial Park is just one of the outdoor green spaces in the Halifax region. One of the capital city's favorite beaches is part of the network of Nova Scotia Provincial Parks. MacCormacks Beach is home to a raised boardwalk, which is wheelchair accessible. From this vantage point, you can see the skyline of Halifax and the Devil's Island lighthouse, as well as the Lawlor and McNabs islands. The boardwalk links the park with the small community of Fisherman's Cove, which offers restaurants and other visitor amenities. The nearby Jerry Lawrence Provincial Park offers accessible fishing, nature trails, and overlooks.

Another coastal favorite, Five Islands Provincial Park preserves a dramatic slice of southern Nova Scotia. The tides of the Bay of Fundy, some of the highest on earth, have carved out steep seaside cliffs. These same tides offer a challenging yet exhilarating setting for ocean kayaking and hikes along the coast. In the summer, park rangers lead walking tours of Five Islands Provincial Park, explaining its unique history and what forces created the landscape present today. Don't forget your camera.

If you want to explore the park on your own, interpretive panels along the walking trails provide more information. The list of things to do beyond the hiking and kayaking are long. Visitors can also enjoy swimming, wildlife watching, and picnicking. Between May and September, Five Islands Provincial Park is one of the most popular campgrounds along the Bay of Fundy for both tent camping and RVs.

Nova Scotia Provincial Parks
Nova Scotia Provincial Parks

Whether you're planning on camping at Five Islands or one of the other Nova Scotia provincial parks, you can arrive at the park any time as long as there is space available. Groups with six or more campers can make reservations at select parks, including Five Islands. Special discounts are available for seniors, both residents and visitors. There are also nearby parks in neighboring New Brunswick that should be highlighted, though they are not technically in Nova Scotia. The Rocks Provincial Park (pictured) is a beautiful area just outside Nova Scotia across the Bay of Fundy and an easy drive from Nova Scotia as part of a day trip or more on your next visit to Eastern Canada.

Top image: taintfair (Flickr), CC BY-SA 2.0

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