Mt Edgecumbe

Mount Edgecumbe Alaska looks much like Mount Fuji, with its cone-shaped peak that is constantly covered in snow. The 3,200-foot volcano is located on the southern tip of Kruzof Island and provides some of the most picturesque views of the scenic island itself, nearby Sitka, and adjacent St. Lazaria Island with its wildlife refuge.

The volcano was originally called L'ux by the Tlingit people but was renamed Mt Edgecumbe in 1778 by Captain James Cook. Although the volcano has not erupted in thousands of years, it is considered inactive, not extinct.

Visitors to Mount Edgecumbe Alaska can take a guided day hike in or make a reservation for an overnight stay at Fred's Creek Forest Service Cabin. Kruzof Island is only accessible by boat or helicopter. The trail to the base of the volcano is easy hiking with flat, open areas.

The distance to the cone from the trailhead is 6.7 miles, with a shelter at the 3.5-mile mark and a convenient campsite prior to ascending the volcano at approximately the six-mile mark. The hiking trail is a gradual climb through forested areas and muskeg—a peat-like soil with decaying plants and vegetation that create a spongy consistency—and becoming much steeper as the trail nears the peak of the volcano.

When planning a hike to the top of Mt Edgecumbe, it is advisable to be prepared with proper clothing for protection against strong, brisk winds. The top of the volcano is barren, and unfavorable winds can come up unexpectedly. Nevertheless, it's well worth the effort, as panoramic views await those who make the climb to the top.

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