Georgia Camping

The state of Georgia has more than 40 campsites statewide for travelers to enjoy. Most Georgia campgrounds are open from late spring until early fall, depending of course upon the weather and the specific location of the Georgia campgrounds you plan to visit. Georgia camping is a popular way for locals and visitors alike to see some of the natural beauty that characterizes this southern state. Whether you plan on camping in north Georgia or plan on camping in Georgia near the beach, Georgia campgrounds are an inexpensive, fun way to see Georgia.

Camping in north Georgia is often an excellent choice, and sites in the north are most frequented during the summer months. Outside the larger cities of Gainesville and Athens, there are about 20 campsites maintained by the state. Some of these Georgia camping sites are right on the beach, such as Traveler"s Rest, Tugaloo, and Hart. Further inland, camping in north Georgia can be enjoyed at Fort Mountain, Cloudland Canyon, and the James H. "Sloppy" Floyd campsites. Many of these sites are also located near historical sites, including Native American landmarks and Civil War forts. Although the south of Georgia is more populated, there are still some great Georgia camping sites all along the southern coast. Perhaps most popular are Fort McAllister Historic Park, Skidaway Island State Park, and the Wormsloe Historic Site.

No matter which area you choose for camping in Georgia, there are some general rules for state parks and camping reservations throughout the state. A two-night minimum is required for weekend reservations, and a three-night minimum is required for Memorial Day, Labor Day and Independence Day weekends. Check-in at all state sites for camping in Georgia between 1 p.m. and 10 p.m., and check-out is always before 1 p.m. RV sites and most regular campsites offer electrical and water hookups, grills or fire rings, and picnic tables. All campgrounds have dump stations, and while some will offer cable television hook-ups, many will not. Pets are also allowed at campsites as long as they are kept on a leash.

Nightly camping fees will change based on the changing campsites, but for campers who plan to stay multiple nights or at multiple campsites, annual passes are available. Annual passes to state parks will offer a discount off of individual fees and are good for one full year. Camping is a great way to see the state of Georgia. Many travelers combine a stay in Atlanta, Savannah, or Columbus with a stay at an area campsite to create a diverse Georgia vacation.

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